Everest Base Camp, A Photo Diary – Higher Ground

Part 3 of the Photo Diary covers days 9-11 as we leave the trees behind and climb above 4,000m, visit Ama Dablam Base Camp, reach the Khumbu Glacier, and trek to Lobouche, at 4,931m our jumping off for Everest Base Camp.

Saturday 12th November: Ama Dablam Base Camp (4,576m)

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Kwangde Re, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Everest (just) & Lhotse, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam Base Camp | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam Base Camp, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam Base Camp, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam Base Camp, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Ama Dablam, Nepal | Sigma DP3 Merrill

Sunday 13th November: Pangbouche to Dingboche (4,360m)

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Everest Massif & Lhotse, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Tawoche & Arakamtse Peaks (left), Awi Peak (Right), Nepal | Sony RX1rII Stitched
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Dingboche, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Prayer Flags, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Making Tea overlooked by Ama Dablam, Dingboche, Nepal | Sony RXrII

Monday 14th November: Dingboche to Lobouche (4,931m)

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Tawoche & Arakamtse Peaks, Nepal | Sony RX1rII Panoramic Mode
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Frozen Yak Pasture below Arakamtse Peak, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Arakamtse Peak with just a glimpse of Cholaste Tso, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Looking back, Ama Dablam (left) & Thamserku (right) Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Khumbu Glacier Terminal Moraine, Everest Climber Memorials, Nepal | Sony RX1rII
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Khumbu Glacier overlooked by Nuptse, Nepal | Sony RX1rII

Diary Notes – Days 9 to 11

Saturday 12th November: Ama Dablam Base Camp (4,576m)

Day eight. A 6am start after no sleep, steep climb up to Ama Dablam Base Camp to push way past 4000m and for the first time leave the trees behind! Superb views of Lhotse and Everest though Everest is partially hidden. Arriving at Base Camp Dunbar spots climbers high up near the summit of Ama Dablam through binoculars. We all take turns but I can’t make them out. It’s my first day without a headache after Deborah, one of our party and a physiotherapist by training, prods at the back of my neck for literally 2 minutes. Unbelievable and I’m forever thankful. Return to Pangbouche at 3:30pm but again can’t get warm. Sit by the fire for 30 minutes, then shower, before back to the Observation Room (and warmth) before tea. Can’t eat.

Sunday 13th November: Pangbouche to Dingboche (4,360m)

Day nine. Made no diary notes, and very little recollection of the day, which indicates my state of mind. What I do recall is barren, but spectacular landscape, immense high mountains over the valley on our left, walking through boulder fields and yak grazing pastures, and it’s stunning. Unfortunately the camera is used less and less because the lack of sleep, food and cold, are having an impact. When we get to Dingboche I must feel ok as I take the camera out for a wander to see if there are any interesting shots to take. Evenings, nights and mornings, are now fading into one, as typically all I do is head for my bed and a hot water bottle. Ask me anything about the teahouse in Dingboche and I’d struggle to answer.

Monday 14th November: Dingboche to Lobouche (4,931m)

Day ten. An early and at this height very cold start. I walk in a daze. Thirty minutes in I see Rob sink to the ground; the cold has got to him! Dunbar feeds him hot water (we all carry hot water in our bottles now, cold water would freeze). Fifteen minutes later Rob is well enough to continue, though to his disgruntlement Dumbar (rightly) takes his rucksack. Yorkshire pride maybe bruised but in this place pride really does come before a fall In the early afternoon we reach the moraine of the Khumbu Glacier. It’s hard going and each step takes real effort, but I feel like we’ve reached a milestone; the glacier means that Everest, though still hidden, is close! At the top of the moraine we pass the memorials of mountaineers who have lost their lives on Everest; a place of real contemplation. After lunch we have the choice of staying at the teahouse or walking to a viewpoint overlooking the Khumbu Glacier. Four of the party opt to remain. I, despite being spent, out of sheer stubbornness* choose to go; a mistake. On returning I’m asked if it was worth it. My immediate and unequivocal answer is NO (though I’m in a minority of one), not because the view wasn’t stunning but because my batteries are totally depleted and I missed the opportunity to rest and recuperate. I’m not alone, John, the doctor in our party, is suffering from a chest infection and from the altitude, is in a bad way, and can go no further. Tomorrow he and Debora will head for lower ground after making it all this way.

* During the many miles of training for the trip, it was the thought of being fit enough to do the optional excursions that drove me on!

Shooting Notes

It was all point and click with the Sony, with the Sigma making a solitary appearance for a close up of Ama Dablam. I didn’t have the energy or enthusiasm for anything else!


3 thoughts on “Everest Base Camp, A Photo Diary – Higher Ground

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